Grandma’s Sock Drawer by Sue Agauas; Michigan Author’s Debut Novel Receives Rave Reviews

Grandma’s gone. Now Sukey races against time to unravel the mysteries of a puzzling inheritance – a sock drawer – from a grandmother she was forbidden to know. A note and a key to Grandma’s “most precious treasure” sends Sukey on wild adventures with unexpected twists and turns. Will Sukey learn the truth about her grandmother, unlock the questions that will lead to peace, and connect her fragmented family? And, can she find the answers before an estate sale ends everything? Author Sue Agauas’ first full-length novel, Grandma’s Sock Drawer, delivers for readers and receives rave reviews.

“In her debut book, Agauas mixes adventure and Christian allegory in a way that’s mildly reminiscent of C.S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia.” – Kirkus Reviews

“In Grandma’s Sock Drawer, Agauas combines masterful storytelling, compelling dialogue and vivid imagery. This is a story of family, love, forgiveness and hope … a must read!” – Angela Wright; Educator, Administrator

Grandma’s Sock Drawer is a read and re-read fantasy novel that can stand alongside classic literature giants. It’s a fanciful tale filled with vivid imagery, suspense, and adventure.” – Evonne L. Rogers; Educator, Curriculum Director, and School Administrator

“I am passionate about the power of love and family,” said Agauas. “I love how books can transport a reader to places near or far, real or imaginary.” She wrote Grandma’s Sock Drawer, her first novel, during the 2017 National Novel Writing Month, also known as NaNoWriMo. “Writing my first book has been an adventure. I’m grateful to all the hands, hearts, and help that coaxed this book into its momentous liftoff.”

Finding support and motivation within the local writing community led Agauas to participate in events with the Rochester Writers organization and to become a member of Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) of Michigan. She founded Why Not Now? Children’s Books LLC – a publishing company. She has been writing picture books for younger readers for many years, and is currently writing book two – her next novel – in the Grandma’s Sock Drawer series. 

With a deep love of nature and animals, Sue feels that stories revolving around emotions, especially joy, have a large impact. For thirty-nine years, she enjoyed teaching children in elementary school. “Having a strong love for learning and discovery, I now endeavor to share these passions with children of all ages through my books,” said Agauas. She finds her greatest happiness when she is spending time with her family, traveling with her husband, writing, and riding her overly clever, but very lovable horse.

Readers can find Grandma’s Sock Drawer in both print and eBook format at numerous outlets including Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Apple Books, Kobo, Bookshop.org, independent bookstores, libraries, and more. Grandma’s Sock Drawer is middle grade fiction, yet appeals to a wide audience that includes teachers, parents, and senior citizens.

By visiting www.SueAgauas.com, visitors can gain insight about Grandma’s Sock Drawer, learn about Agauas’ history, read her blog, and order the book. In addition, teachers will find online resources for using Grandma’s Sock Drawer in the classroom.

About the Author

After a 39-year successful career as an elementary school teacher, Sue Agauas retired in 2016. She is married to her high school sweetheart and they have two adult children. A strong love of God, family, and animals (especially horses) drives her passion for life. Sue lives in Sterling Heights, MI with her husband, enjoys writing, and spending time with her grandchild.

Product Information

BOOK: Grandma’s Sock Drawer
AUTHOR: Sue Agauas
PAPERBACK: 336 pages
PUBLISHER: Why Not Now Children’s Books LLC
PUBLICATION DATE: February 25, 2020
LANGUAGE: English
ISBN-10: 1732271119
ISBN-13: 978-1732271111
PRODUCT DIMENSIONS: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
PRICE: $14.99/paperback, $3.99/eBook

Launch of Grandma’s Sock Drawer

Hurray!!

It’s finally happened!

I’m happy to announce that:

Grandma’s Sock Drawer is up, out, and available for eager readers.

Follow the adventures of Sukey as she struggles to unravel the mystery of the unusual gift left to her by her missing grandmother. Discover, with Sukey, the  meaning behind her grandmother’s most ‘precious treasure’, a sock drawer. 

Many thanks to all the hands, hearts, and help that coaxed this book into its momentous liftoff.

Grandma’s Sock Drawer is available through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Apple Books, Kobo, Bookshop.org, and more!

Visit my website: sueagauas.com, for free materials to use with Grandma’s Sock Drawer. You’ll find a delightful word search, match the characters page, and a chapter by chapter comprehension guide, with corresponding answer keys.

Keep your eyes peeled for future adventures with Sukey!

Lessons of the Jigsaw Puzzle

“I’m missing a piece!” My plaintive cry resounds through the empty kitchen. 

You’d think a brand new puzzle would not have a missing piece! But somehow it has happened, and I will have to write the company to tell them of the mishap in their production.

I certainly didn’t lose the piece! The puzzle rests undisturbed on the kitchen table, just like the other 36 puzzles I completed during virus lock down. 

And, I know this piece is missing, because only green palm trees, brown tree trunks, and blue sky pieces are left.

My missing piece belongs next to the octopus. It is the color of sand. I’ve touched each piece I have left and there is no plain, sandy-colored piece!

I imagined a beautiful puzzle, now going to be incomplete.

What a shame, I lamented to myself!

All anyone will be able to look at is that one blank spot.

It will never be beautiful.

It will never be perfect, I thought.

The missing piece was the last lesson this jigsaw puzzle had for me. 

But we argued from the beginning.

“I can’t do this! It’s too hard!” I had whined when frame pieces wouldn’t connect, and every piece looked the same.

I’d stab around, listlessly poking pieces at each other, until, “Hey, what do you know? That fit!”

Jigsaw lesson #1:

Don’t give up.              

                         Philipians 4:13        

I can do all things through Christ.

The piece with the cluster of coconuts fit snugly in the center of a palm tree. It looked good. Its color and shape said I was right. But then the remaining pieces, did not connect, no matter how hard I tried to cram them together.

“Faulty puzzle,” I moaned to myself.

The puzzle and I were at a stand-off.

This forced me to reexamine my choice.

Hmm, just maybe…

I removed the ‘for sure’ piece and surprise! The piece I thought fit,  ‘for sure’, was wrong. It had to come out before the correct piece could go in, that is, of course, if I wanted the puzzle picture to turn out correctly.

Jigsaw lesson #2: 

I must take the wrong piece out, before the right piece can get in.

In life situations, if I hold onto unforgiveness, love will never get a chance in. 

But if I let go of unforgiveness, there will be room for the truly best piece, love.

I Corinthians  13:8  Love never fails.

Which brings me to my last jigsaw lesson. 

The lesson of the piece I knew, without a shadow of a doubt, was missing. 

I knew it wasn’t there.

I’d looked and looked.

                     And then,     

             I  picked up this piece.

Hmm, this piece couldn’t be the right one. Look at that little cloud. My missing piece is just a plain, sandy-colored piece….

Jigsaw lesson #3:

         You don’t know. Even when you are so sure. You don’t know how something that seems impossible, something you know won’t work out, something that could never be good again, could never be perfect… 

When you put your trust in God.

The “impossible” can happen.

Luke 1:37   For with God nothing will be impossible.

Crossing the Picture Book Finish Line!

February 2020 comes to a close, with an extra day to finish the Picture Book Marathon. Once again, creating 26 picture books in a month was a rewarding exercise. More than half of my books were fiction, three were versions of ABC books, four played with numbers or counting, three were nonfiction embedded in fiction, and the others played with repetitive phrasing or putting a new twist to an old nursery rhyme.

Are they all prize winners? Of course not! But there might be a seed for a successful rewrite.

Was it easy?

Absolutely not! Some days I spent hours researching animals that I wanted to incorporate into my story. That’s one of the things I love about writing, I am continually learning and then try to pass that on to children in a fun and imaginative way.

Some of my favorite stories this month are those that are ridiculously fun. The impossible happens, the ridiculous runs to extremes, and by the end laughter has lifted child and adult reader beyond this ordinary world.

Another favorite of mine, was a counting to ten book I imagined my 18 month old granddaughter might compose. It was filled with all her favorites, such as ten wild blueberries on her purple plate, which she couldn’t resist eating, and replacing, again and again. When it came to her five favorite colors, they started out all different, but let’s be honest, her favorite color is orange. So she substituted orange for four of the five colors, allowing only yellow to remain in the group.

So you see, the Picture Book Marathon for me was a month to stretch my creativity within a set deadline while underlining my belief, that all learning can and should be fun.

You’re always a winner when you try.

The Year I Went Off Course

As I mentioned in an earlier blog post, I have run the Picture Book Marathon since 2010. But after 9 years of successfully completing the race, in 2018 I went off course for a very exciting reason.

November 2017, I had participated in my ninth Nannowrimo, (National Novel Writing Month). The fantasy middle grade novel that I wrote that month was one I knew I wanted to spend time and effort to revise and rewrite in the coming year.

The holiday season was a time to put aside the novel and enjoy family and friends. In January an opportunity arose to test the level of interest my novel would gather. Hurriedly, I rewrote and prepared the first six chapters to apply for the opportunity to appear on Kindle Scout for one month. 

Four days into February 2018, with 4 picture books completed, I learned that Kindle Scout accepted my submission. Starting February 5, 2018, the first six chapters of my book were available for people to read. 

 I was overjoyed! 

For the rest of February, people were reading my book! It was even called  “hot and trending” several days. There’s not a better feeling to a writer than to have his work read and enjoyed.

The rest of February was spent sharing this event with friends and family. That’s how I went off course in Picture Book Marathon of February 2018.

The positive feedback from that month supplied the energy to work on the novel to its completion. That’s the year I went off course from the Picture Book Marathon.

And that’s the year a whole new adventure began.

The Halfway Mark

Day thirteen of February is halfway to completing the 26 picture books in the Picture Book Marathon.

Hooray!

Thursday, February 13, is the official halfway point in the Picture Book Marathon. It’s always good to celebrate your accomplishments. If you actually ran thirteen miles, you would celebrate! So, too, writing thirteen picture books, or creating thirteen ideas for stories, is reason for celebration.

Celebrate your accomplishments!

You need thirteen more ideas to finish the Picture Book Marathon. Allow me to offer a few suggestions to help you finish the race.

Ideas are all around.

A photo, a saying or phrase, a memory from childhood, pets, fears, joys, foods, disappointments, overheard conversations, new twists on nursery rhymes, or fairy tales, ridiculous impossibilities, nature, friends, family, failures, successes, concept books, such as ABC’s, counting, opposites, or shapes.

The best advice I can give is to relax. Have fun. Try writing things you’ve never written before, like a new version of Hickory, Dickory, Dock. Make it wild. Make it touching. Try nonfiction, fantasy, or rhyming.

Make this Picture Book Marathon a race of exploration and fun. Remember, this is just the beginning of your creative projects that could turn into a wonderful picture book!

See you at the finish line!

Keep writing!

Picture Book Marathon

Yay! February has arrived! Today I begin writing for my traditional Picture Book Marathon.

In 2010 I stumbled upon a website that challenged picture book writers to create one picture book story, or at least the idea for one, for each of twenty-six days through February. I was looking for a new writing challenge since finishing my first NaNoWriMo novel in November 2009. That challenge was to write a 50,000 word novel in the month of November.

Writing a picture book a day seemed like it would be a walk in the park, after the demanding quota of 1,667 words per day of the Nano novel challenge. Writing 500 to 800 words or less seemed like a cinch

A piece of cake, I thought. And, as icing on the cake, you only needed 26 stories to match the 26 miles of a marathon, leaving 2 whole days in February to relax! (Unless it was leap year, like this year, then you had 3 whole days off!)

But the Picture Book Marathon had its own tests of endurance, in store for me, unique to writing for young children.

Though sometimes gasping for air, or clutching cramped writing muscles, I have managed to cross the finish line for 9 of these last 10 years.

More, later, about that one year I went off course. Right now, the starter gun has fired and I’m off to start my second decade of picture book marathons!

David Stricklen’s Ripley Robinson and the Worm Charmer

David Stricklen’s newest book: Ripley Robinson and the Worm Charmer, is a must read for page-turning reading satisfaction. Stricklen hooks you on the first page and carries you on a roller coaster of ups, downs, and spirals as Ripley attempts to adjust to his new school and classmates. Stricklen skillfully portrays Ripley’s hopes, fears, and his inward struggles to do the right thing, which creates a strong pull through the story straight to the finish. You’ll step off this great ride and, like me, want to see what will happen next in the life of Ripley Robinson. 

A New Writing Adventure

GET READY!
Kindergarten. First day. Chunky red crayon with flattened side.  Can I color?  Inside a circle? Doubts, insecurities, weak skills. The spotlight shines inward under an overwhelming onslaught of new stimuli.  Being a writer is just like being in Kindergarten. Focus first, is inward. Do I have the skills? What is my story?  What is my voice?  Red is stop but also start. The necessary inward focus. Wait so you can grow. Develop. Practice. Fail. Succeed. Repeat. Then one day, you look up and see, you’re not alone.

GET SET!
Surprise! There’s a whole world out there! It’s not just about you! This can be an alarming discovery. Yellow shifts the focus. There’s other kids in class. And, guess what? They might have some doubts, insecurities, and some skills, just like you!
Yellow light is the pause. The gathering of all that you are and deciding what you are going to do. Keep to yourself? Or take a chance?   

GO!
Green is the moment you reach out. The moment sharing what you have, is more important than any perceived imperfections that always linger.  Green light is the time of connecting, discovering how sharing the little you have with the offering of another, can create a feast for everyone.  I’m thrilled to find myself at the GO time in my writing endeavors.

It’s just the start of something wonderful!

The Journey Begins

Thanks for joining me!

Grandma’s Sock Drawer, a teen/young adult novel, has been accepted by Kindle Scout for a 30-day trial!

Grandma’s gone. Sukey’s inheritance is an envelope with Grandma’s letter and a key to Grandma’s ‘most precious treasure’, her sock drawer!

Why did a grandma that Sukey did not know, leave such a strange gift to her?

How do three pairs of unusual socks transport Sukey to other worlds?

Sukey must unravel the puzzle behind the drawer’s contents, and the new worlds they reveal, before the estate sale.

Will Sukey unlock hidden mysteries that lead to peace and connect her fragmented family?

This novel was created during the 2017 National Novel Writing Month, fondly known as NaNoWriMo.

NaNoWriMo is a whirlwind writing challenge to create a new novel, of at least 50,000 words, in the month of November.

During this creative endeavor, the writer is admonished to forsake editing of any kind.  To plunge headfirst into the characters and their mission to solve all problems to attain their goals.

Getting lost in this kind of free-wheeling creativity is a thrilling roller-coaster ride.

Some days you feel like you are just clink-clinking your way slowly to your daily word count of 1,667. You feel like your characters and plot are caught in a never-ending uphill climb.

But then, if you push through, you hit peaks that send you at break-neck speeds through the twists and turns of plot development as your character shrieks with joy before reeling again into another problem.

It’s quite a ride! But worth every moment of creativity.

At the end of November, Grandma’s Sock Drawer was complete.

Well, complete enough to begin the next step in the adventure. Perhaps, a more grueling step than the first.

“Good company in a journey makes the way seem shorter.” — Izaak Walton